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McAfee, Andrew Society. Personalities Kurzweil, Ray

Srinivasa Ramanujan

Born:22 December 1887;Tamil Nadu, India
Died:26 April 1920;Tamil Nadu, India

Srinivasa Ramanujan was an Indian mathematician.

Though he had almost no formal training in pure mathematics, he made substantial contributions to mathematical analysis, number theory, infinite series, and continued fractions, including solutions to mathematical problems considered to be unsolvable. Ramanujan initially developed his own mathematical research in isolation; it was quickly recognized by Indian mathematicians.

Prof. G. H. Hardy said that Ramanujan's discoveries are unusually rich and that there is often more to them than initially meets the eye. As a byproduct of his work, new directions of research were opened up.

Examples of the most interesting of these formulae include the intriguing infinite series for π, one of which is given below:

Another elegant formula:

Hardy–Ramanujan number

Number 1729.

It is known as the Hardy–Ramanujan number, after an anecdote of the British mathematician G. H. Hardy when he visited Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan in hospital. He related their conversation:

I remember once going to see him when he was ill at Putney. I had ridden in taxi cab number 1729 and remarked that the number seemed to me rather a dull one, and that I hoped it was not an unfavorable omen.

"No," he replied, "it is a very interesting number; it is the smallest number expressible as the sum of two cubes in two different ways.

The two different ways are: 1729 = 13 + 123 = 93 + 103

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